1st passes of 2010 - Page 3 - Kawasaki Forums


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Old 03-31-2010, 12:16 AM
768 Ryda's Avatar
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Originally Posted by CDN ZX6r View Post
Thanks for clarifying that for me. I might have my info. a little off. From what I understood, lowering the bike too much from its' engineered settings can cause certain handling problems. One being ground clearance. Another, possibly more common problem would be if the bike was lowered using only a fixed lowering link on its' own. This would allow the rider to touch the ground as they want to, but also this would change the balance of the bike. Most bikes carry around 51 and 52 per cent of its weight on the front wheel. If one was to lower the back only, they would have moved a significant amount of the weight towards the rear wheel. This would increase rear tire grip during hard acceleration, but will cost the rider a lot of confidence in what the front of the bike is doing. Especially in the wet or during hard cornering. They would notice a vague feeling in the front, or maybe even lose control if the pavement surface is compromised by moisture, sand, dirt, or whatever when fast cornering. Dropping only the back also changes the rake and trail of your bike's stock front suspension geometry. As the rear is lowered, the rake angle of your forks increases, slowly turning your bike into a chopper, with all the handling traits that go along with it, namely a large increase in effort to initiate turns, and disrupted manners when braking while leaned over. This, combined with the reduced weight on the front end, makes for a bike that handles pretty miserably and you may lose any riding confidence that you gained from being able to put your feet down. My concern with some lowering links, is that they move the wheel way up in its travel without altering the starting point in the stroke of the shock. ( If you hit a really big bump you will bottom out quicker than bikes without the lower link.) Even worse, if the adjustment made with the lower link is too great, the rear tire could damage the plastic underbelly of the tail section. Especially if pre-load is backed off. My point is that keeping the bike correctly balanced should be the main goal. If that means safely tri-podding at a stop light, instead of being flat footed, then I would do it. Obviously you have kept the right balance for your bike 768ryda, and that is great! I wasn't sure how to successfully achieve it, so I left well enough alone. Now that I know it's possible though, I might look into dropping mine a little bit too!
no problem, but if you just lower the front of a motorcycle & not lower the back any then yes it will screw up the handeling but if you lower the back the same as the front then it want upset the ride as much... ive lowered & stretched plenty of bikes in my past and i know if done right it want hurt anything...
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