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Gear to take on motorcycle camping trip

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Old 03-28-2012, 03:50 AM
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Default Gear to take on motorcycle camping trip

Starting to get a list together of what I need on my camping trip on the bike. I've been lookin at tents for one. I need a light one of course. I usually do most of my shopping at cabelas since i have their card. Any suggestions on what to get?
 
  #2  
Old 03-31-2012, 01:11 AM
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Done a lot of motorcycle based camping, although none off-road.
As to tents, got to go free standing, not all campsites are created equal and it can be a pain to drive stakes into rocky ground, so free standing takes that hassle out of the equation. And bigger than you need (2-3person), as long as the packed size isn't huge, is great for keeping the rest of your stuff in out of the weather.
A Thermorest air mattress, can't believe I camped for years w/o one, it makes rocky ground comfy, and insulates you against cold ground.
Dry bags to pack your crap in and keep it dry, they are very nice and come in lots of sizes.
A collapsible water jug is useful if you are going off the beaten path and water is scarce. It takes almost zero space when empty and holds a couple gallons when full.
If you need a stove - I don't like carrying a white gas stove on a bike (a crash is almost sure to cause a fire if you puncture the can and if the fumes hit a hot exhaust or motor), so I use one that uses pressurized canisters(light but bulky and always run out in the middle of cooking).
More than 2¢, but that's what I got.
Go and have a ton of fun and take some pics for those of us stuck at work!
 
  #3  
Old 04-01-2012, 06:26 PM
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Originally Posted by MaximusPrime View Post
Done a lot of motorcycle based camping, although none off-road.
As to tents, got to go free standing, not all campsites are created equal and it can be a pain to drive stakes into rocky ground, so free standing takes that hassle out of the equation. And bigger than you need (2-3person), as long as the packed size isn't huge, is great for keeping the rest of your stuff in out of the weather.
A Thermorest air mattress, can't believe I camped for years w/o one, it makes rocky ground comfy, and insulates you against cold ground.
Dry bags to pack your crap in and keep it dry, they are very nice and come in lots of sizes.
A collapsible water jug is useful if you are going off the beaten path and water is scarce. It takes almost zero space when empty and holds a couple gallons when full.
If you need a stove - I don't like carrying a white gas stove on a bike (a crash is almost sure to cause a fire if you puncture the can and if the fumes hit a hot exhaust or motor), so I use one that uses pressurized canisters(light but bulky and always run out in the middle of cooking).
More than 2¢, but that's what I got.
Go and have a ton of fun and take some pics for those of us stuck at work!
Thanks Prime! I saw they make dual fuel stoves. One that runs on regular gas. Since Im already carrying gas I'd say this would be a good thing to buy?? Whats a thremorest mattress? Guess I've never heard of it. I have collapsable jugs. What freestanding tents you recommend??
 
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Old 04-01-2012, 09:23 PM
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A Thermorest is a brand of roll-up air mattress, used instead of the old foam sleeping pad. Open the air valve blow into it for a few seconds, close valve, lay down and fall asleep, on gravel if need be. (Used one paddling a river in the Arctic where we slept on gravel bars...I never once felt a rock and slept like a baby.) Stowing is as easy as opening the valve, rolling it up tight (from the opposite end as the valve) and close the valve when you get to the end and put a strap around to keep it rolled up.

I have a Walrus™ that is from my winter camping days, it's overkill now. It's been a long time since I bought a tent, Cabellas should have one that'll work. I would practice putting it up and taking it down, before you have to do it after dark and in the rain.
If money is not a problem, a nice campsite tarp(not a blue tarp, they roll up much smaller than the blue ones) can be great to set up over your campsite, but they can get expensive. Nice to have a dry or shady spot that is not the tent to hang out. I used to have a Kelty™ that would cover most of a picnic table.

Also been a long time since I bought a stove - if the stove you're looking at really runs on gasoline, not white gas, then go for it. And some dual fuel stoves require a different pilot jet when switching fuels, just make sure you are using the right one before you go.

If you have an REI, EMS, or some such hiking/camping store go in and pick the person that actually has used some of the gear and pick their brain. Hikers have to put it all on their back and therefore require small, lightweight stuff, which transfers to our lack of space on the bike pretty well.

I usually use a checklist like this... Printer Friendly Camping Checklist – Camping List ....and modify it to my needs. Comes in handy when all the gear is on the floor and waiting to get packed up. I check it off as I pack, mostly so I don't have to unpack because I can't remember whether or not I already packed it.
 
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Old 04-02-2012, 02:31 AM
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Originally Posted by MaximusPrime View Post
A Thermorest is a brand of roll-up air mattress, used instead of the old foam sleeping pad. Open the air valve blow into it for a few seconds, close valve, lay down and fall asleep, on gravel if need be. (Used one paddling a river in the Arctic where we slept on gravel bars...I never once felt a rock and slept like a baby.) Stowing is as easy as opening the valve, rolling it up tight (from the opposite end as the valve) and close the valve when you get to the end and put a strap around to keep it rolled up.

I have a Walrus™ that is from my winter camping days, it's overkill now. It's been a long time since I bought a tent, Cabellas should have one that'll work. I would practice putting it up and taking it down, before you have to do it after dark and in the rain.
If money is not a problem, a nice campsite tarp(not a blue tarp, they roll up much smaller than the blue ones) can be great to set up over your campsite, but they can get expensive. Nice to have a dry or shady spot that is not the tent to hang out. I used to have a Kelty™ that would cover most of a picnic table.

Also been a long time since I bought a stove - if the stove you're looking at really runs on gasoline, not white gas, then go for it. And some dual fuel stoves require a different pilot jet when switching fuels, just make sure you are using the right one before you go.

If you have an REI, EMS, or some such hiking/camping store go in and pick the person that actually has used some of the gear and pick their brain. Hikers have to put it all on their back and therefore require small, lightweight stuff, which transfers to our lack of space on the bike pretty well.

I usually use a checklist like this... Printer Friendly Camping Checklist – Camping List ....and modify it to my needs. Comes in handy when all the gear is on the floor and waiting to get packed up. I check it off as I pack, mostly so I don't have to unpack because I can't remember whether or not I already packed it.
Thanks alot for the info. I thought the dual fuel stove was a great idea. Yes it does burn unleaded fuel and since I carry an extra 3 gallons with me, thats no prob. Right now all I have is an old sleepin bag but i will look into a mat too. A tarp is a great idea! Wonder how much I can carry on a klx?? haha. Sounds like your load is meant for a klr650! haha. How much on that list have you taken on your trips and how long were you gone for?
 
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Old 04-02-2012, 02:57 AM
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The list is just an idea generator of what you might want to bring or need to bring.
You can fit a lot in a canoe, but I probably crossed off half that list from the start.
We were in the Arctic for 3 weeks with no support and not another human to be seen, so we had everything we needed, from food to repair stuff (for gear and human alike).
When I rode a motorcycle cross country I only carried a stove, tent, sleeping bag and pad, and clothes. I bought food along the way at grocery stores.
Will be trying out some gravel road/trail camping after the busy season at work is over this Fall and my KLX is finally broken in.
 
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Old 04-11-2012, 12:21 AM
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Originally Posted by MaximusPrime View Post
The list is just an idea generator of what you might want to bring or need to bring.
You can fit a lot in a canoe, but I probably crossed off half that list from the start.
We were in the Arctic for 3 weeks with no support and not another human to be seen, so we had everything we needed, from food to repair stuff (for gear and human alike).
When I rode a motorcycle cross country I only carried a stove, tent, sleeping bag and pad, and clothes. I bought food along the way at grocery stores.
Will be trying out some gravel road/trail camping after the busy season at work is over this Fall and my KLX is finally broken in.
Thanks alot for the info. Im gonna do some trial runs with my bike totally loaded and do some small trips to see how it handles and stuff. I've been stock piling up on stuff to buy. Next yr is the big trip. I got my nomadic rack installed. I've already got all my luggage too.
 
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Old 09-21-2012, 03:59 AM
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Awww... and this thread died so long ago... what a shame! Doesn't anybody do off-road primitive camping? I did my first trip a few weeks ago, and I'm hooked! We did a 120+ mile (all off-road) trip, with a primitive camp-over in the middle. Did okay with packing too, though I'm making adjustments for the next trip (hopefully, tomorrow).

Tent, sleeping pad, and sleeping bag are going to be your biggest space hogs. They're not necessarily heavy, but they are bulky. If you can get a compression sack, that helps a little with the sleeping bag. The only other stuff I took was clothing (layers), a water purifier pump, a couple water bottles - including a 1 qt collapsible bottle, some food, first aid kit, tool kit, fire starting stuff, small cook kit with cup and bowl, small saw, some wet-wipes (don't forget these!!! They're great for a quick "shower" in the tent, and they beat using poison ivy leaves for TP), and... a couple 20 oz bottles of spare gasoline. Shouldn't need the extra gas this time, as we won't be going that far, so I'll bring some warmer clothes instead. Should be into the 30's at night...

Hoping to get this thread going again... There has to be more interest in this type of adventure riding than a measly 7 posts.

Here's a pic of my setup last trip. I had 4 main bags strapped on... tent, pad, sleeping bag, clothes/etc. Saddle bags held food, tools, and gas (not in the same side as the food).
 
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  #9  
Old 09-22-2012, 12:37 PM
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I've got a similar setup on my KLX with Wolfman E-10 saddlebags, dufflebag, Wolfman enduro tank bag and a dirt-bike-gear number plate bag. I also carried gear in my Camelbak Snodawg but it proved to be too bulky and I ended up strapping that onto the bike behind the Wolfman dufflebag. One item I ended up using in some sticky situations was my Corona folding saw. I didn't realize how valuable it would be for clearning trails, cutting wood for fire, etc. I'll be looking to upgrade this important piece of gear.

Lousy picture but you'll get the idea

 
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Old 09-23-2012, 03:27 PM
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Heres some of my camping gear that I was issued while in the military. Works great for backpack camping so should work pretty well for use on a motorcycle. The sleeping bag is attached to the bottom of the pack.

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I don't take all of this but the gear in the pic is:
1. camp stove
2. water filter
3. Microfiber quickdry towel
4. solar recharge panel (for mp3 player, phone, spare batteries)
5. Waterproof bag (backpack isn't waterproof)
6. Bivy, aka 1 man tent
7. Inflatable pillow
8. 300' rope with grapple hook (I was an EOD tech, one of our basic tools)
9. Bayonet with multitool
10. flashlight
11. 1 person hammock
12. rechargeable batteries
13. compass/signal mirror/strobe/fire start kit.

The 2 extra pockets are holding spare clothes for long camping trips along with cold weather clothing. This setup leaves the main compartment available for food/water/ammo etc.

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